Save on Home and Garden Items from Amazon.

Save on Scrapbooking Supplies

Monday

10 favorite Easter basket candy picks



Hey, Easter Bunny! What’s in your basket? Easter eggs may be a perennial favorite, but Easter candy can really light up the eyes of any Easter basket recipient.

What are your best Easter basket candy treats each year? Here are our top 10 favorite candies for Easter baskets (listed alphabetically).


The Cadbury Crème Egg is an annual Easter basket essential candy treat. Created to look like a real egg, the foil-wrapped Cadbury crème egg has a milk chocolate shell. Inside is a gooey white and yellow sweet cream filling.

Besides, who doesn’t love those Cadbury egg commercials on television each year, with the clucking bunny and the eggs?


‘Nuff said.

But wait. Let’s be serious. The cheap hollow chocolate rabbits are nothing to write home about. Better to spring for the quality solid chocolate ones, Easter Bunny.


No holiday is complete without the appropriately colored M and M’s candies. In the spring, M and M’s come in pretty pastel colors for Easter. Candy-coated chocolate treats (in plain, peanut or other styles), Easter M and M’s come in big bags, as well as colorful plastic Easter eggs.

Why not buy both? The plastic Easter eggs, filled with M and M’s, are great for children’s Easter baskets, while the big bag of M and M’s may be just right for the Easter Bunny himself (or herself).

Hey, the Easter Bunny has a sweet tooth too.

An earlier version of this article originally appeared on a Yahoo property, which is now closed. All publication rights reside with the author.


Ask any kid. PEZ candies are sweet little hard bricks that come in several colors and flavors. But that’s not why children like them. PEZ candies come with plastic mechanical dispensers that are fun to use. Kids pull back the themed heads (cartoon characters, holiday icons or even superheroes) to pop out the PEZ candies.

Easter PEZ dispensers usually sport cute bunnies, chicks, Easter eggs, or lambs.  Some Easter PEZ dispensers and candies even come enclosed in plastic Easter eggs, ready for tucking into an Easter basket.


Marshmallow Peeps were once reserved only for Easter. Now the sugar-covered sweet candy treats are available for just about any holiday. But Easter is the top traditional Marshmallow Peep day of all.

Should Marshmallow Peeps be eaten soft and fresh (right out of the package), or are the chewy bunnies, chicks, ducks and other colorful candies better a little older and crunchier? And what is the proper way to eat a peep? (Ask the Easter Bunny.)


What more needs to be said about a big cellophane cone, filled with orange Reese’s pieces?

7. Smucker’s Jelly Beans

All kinds of candy companies make jelly beans, and nearly everyone has a favorite. Some like ‘em tart or tangy, while others prefer the gritty sweet ones. Classic Brach’s, Jelly Belly, Jolly Rancher, Starburst, and other kinds of jelly beans are fine. But nothing beats the fruity jam-like flavoring of the Smucker’s Jelly Beans, if you can find them.


Only at Easter can one find Snickers formed into egg shapes and wrapped in foil. Butterfinger Eggs, Nestle Crunch Eggs, Twix Eggs, and other chocolate candy bar favorite Easter eggs are also available. Stick ‘em in the freezer! For a cool Easter treat.


Colorful speckled candy robin eggs are another Easter basket favorite. A crunchy malted milk center, coated with milk chocolate and covered with a hard candy shell make speckled robin eggs a super Easter basket candy surprise.

Brach’s, Hershey, Whopper, and other varieties of speckled robin egg Easter candies are available. Take your pick for Easter baskets.


These mouth-puckering sour treats may not be a grownup’s top taste pick, but they sure look colorful and sweet in an Easter basket. And kids can’t seem to get enough of them.

Perhaps every family has its own favorite Easter basket candy contents. What’s nestled in the shredded Easter grass in your Easter basket?


NOTE:  This blogger has no affiliation with any product/s mentioned in this post and received no remuneration from the manufacturer/s or product promoter/s for this post.


Image/s:

10 favorite Easter basket candy picks

Created by this user, including public domain artwork

Feel free to follow on Google Plus and Twitter. Like this blog?  Check out Practically at Home on Facebook.


Sunday

White sink wiping without sinking to griping



Sometimes a solution is far simpler than it has to be. My sparkling white kitchen sink proves that point – sort of.

Someone in my house has a definite thing – a real penchant – for leaving little sticky notes around, especially to declare discontent or to instruct other family members to do certain tasks or projects. (Team Motivation 101, right?)

Here’s a recent example, although I cleaned it up slightly.


Touche!

Color me tea drinker. I might be the only tea drinker in the house. Of course, the sticky note writer drinks coffee (LOTS of coffee), and we have to wonder where the coffee grounds are going.

But I digress.

The sink stain cleanup is simple.


It doesn’t have to be the expensive stuff, like Rembrandt Deeply White Whitening Fluoride Toothpaste.

That’s the secret weapon. In fact, I keep a couple of nearly-empty toothpaste tubes (You know, the ones that have become a little crusty around the cap area, so no one wants to use them anymore.) under the kitchen sink for just this purpose.

Whenever the pristine white sink doesn’t not so pristine (which is nearly daily in a home where at least one person somehow manages often to drip ketchup or pizza sauce into the sink and where another leaves empty soda cans inverted there to drain before recycling), I grab the stashed toothpaste and an old toothbrush and perform my little sink magic in seconds.

Poof! No more sink stain. Plus, my sink smells minty fresh. (OK, that may have taken it a little far.)

Toothpaste seems like a better solution for cleaning most sorts of sinks, as it’s not nearly as abrasive as a scouring cleansing powder. Plus, I wouldn’t dream of using steel wool or a scrubbing pad on my smooth-surfaced sink.

Hey, if professional dentists claim whitening toothpaste is safe for our teeth, wouldn’t it be safe for my sink too? (Don’t answer that.)

Now our resident note-writer has to find another topic. Sink cleaning has become a non-issue.

NOTE:  This blogger has no affiliation with any product/s mentioned in this post and received no remuneration from the manufacturer/s or product promoter/s for this post.


Image/s:
Created by this user, including public domain artwork

Feel free to follow on Google Plus and Twitter. Like this blog?  Check out Practically at Home on Facebook.


Tuesday

King's Hawaiian Sliced Bread is worth a toast or two.




I think I have a new breakfast favorite in King’s Hawaiian Sliced Bread. Nope, I didn’t receive a free sample or coupon or anything. I just stumbled on the stuff at the store.

Aloha, morning toast.

For as long as I can remember, we’ve enjoyed the King's Original Hawaiian Sweet Rolls and the King's Hawaiian Bread Hamburger Buns

And I cannot count the times we’ve plucked off pieces of King's Original Hawaiian Round Loaf Sweet Bread to sop up spinach dip. 

But we’d never tried the sliced loaf version of the sweet Hawaiian bread.

Sure, King's Original Hawaiian Sweet Sliced Bread is white bread. But it is pretty tasty, right out of the toaster. It’s soft and fluffy and warms right up like old-fashioned Texas Toast. It also makes pretty wonderful French toast.

The only trick is this: King's Hawaiian Sweet Sliced Bread doesn't last too many days before it dries out and becomes less appealing. It's gotta be used promptly, while it is still fluffy.

Maybe I’ll load up on whole grains in a day or two. But for this morning, a couple of slices of cushy comfort food is just the ticket.

NOTE:  This blogger has no affiliation with the product mentioned in this post and received no remuneration from the manufacturer or its promoters for this post.

Image/s:
Product photos 
by LAN/Nickers and Ink –
All rights reserved.

Feel free to follow on Google Plus and Twitter. Like this blog?  Check out Practically at Home on Facebook.


LinkWithin

Blog Widget by LinkWithin